Marveling At The Historical

Math Oldies But Goodies

  • About This Blog

    This blog is mostly about math procedures in textbooks dated from about 1825-1900. I’m writing about them because some of the procedures are exquisite and much more powerful, and simpler, than some of the procedures in current text books. Really!

    I update this blog as frequently as possible ... every 2-3 days. And, if you are a lover of old texts and unique procedures, you might want to talk to me about them, at markdotmath@gmail.com. I’m not an antiquarian; the books I have are dusty, musty, brown-paged scribbled-in texts written by authors with insights into how math works. Unfortunately, most of their procedures have vanished. They’ve been overcome by more traditional perspectives, but you have to realize that at that time, they were teaching the traditional methods.

In 1877, Mr. Ray Reasons with Fractions

Posted by mark schwartz on September 8, 2016

Introduction

In Mr. Ray’s 1877 Ray’s New Intellectual Arithmetic, an elementary school text, he presents some of the problems with their solution. A sample of these are worth looking at because in every case he shows a solution method which is based on fractions and knowing how to handle a sequence of fractions. But it’s not only the sequence of fraction operations but also the logic of these fraction operations that elementary school children had to follow. This required them to think about the relationships in the problem. I’d like to further note that this method of solution for all 7 problems presented here is seen in many of the texts of that era. It really required students to understand fractions! I’m not proposing that we use this “fractional” method in lieu of solving them by either proportions – the first 4 problems – or simple equations, the last 3 problems.

The Story

All these problems are from his text. Read the solutions slowly to really enjoy the subtlety of the method.

  1. A yard of cloth costs $6, what would 2/3 of a yard cost?  (Pg. 48, # 3)

Solution: 1/3 of a yard would cost 1/3 of $6, which is $2; then, 2/3 of a yard would cost 2 times $2, which are $4.

  1. If 3 oranges are worth 15 cents, what are 2 oranges worth?  (Pg. 49, #19)

Solution: 1 orange is worth 1/3 of 15, or 5 cents; then 2 oranges are worth 2 times 5 cents, which are 10 cents.

  1. At $2/3 a yard, how much cloth can be purchased for $3/4?  (Pg. 75, # 5)

Solution: For $1/3, 1/2 a yard can be purchased, and for $1, 3/2 of a yard; then, for $1/4, 1/4 of 3/2, or 5/8 of a yard can be purchased, and for $3/4, 9/8 = 1 and 1/8.

  1. If 2/3 of a yard o cloth costs $5, what will 3/4 of a yard cost?  (Pg. 101, # 2)

Solution: The cost of 1/3 of a yard will be 1/2 of $5 = $5/2; and a yard will cost 3 times $5/2 = $15/2; then, 1/4 of a yard will cost 1/4 of $15/2 = $15/8; and 3/4 of a yard will cost 3 times $15/8 = $5 and 5/8.

Note that these 4 problems lend themselves well to being solved using proportions. What follows now are 3 more problems, which if presented in today’s texts would likely be solved with simple equations, but again Mr. Ray’s solutions are a sequence of fraction operations.

  1. If you have 8 cents and 3/4 of your money equals 2/3 of mine, how many cents have I? (Pg. 52, #17)

Solution: ¾ of 8 cents = 6 cents; then 2/3 of my money = 6 cents, 1/3 of my money is 1/2 of 6 cents = 3 cents, and all my money is 3 times 3 cents = 9 cents.

  1. Divide 15 into two parts, so that the less part may be 2/3 of the greater.  (Pg. 106, #1)

Solution: 3/3 + 2/3 = 5/3; 5/3 of the greater part = 15; then, 1/3 of the greater part is 1/5 of 15 = 3, and the greater part is 3 times 3 = 9; the less part is 15 ̶ 9 = 6.

  1. A and B mow a field in 4 days; B can mow it alone in 12 days: in what time can A mow it?  (Pg. 110, #14)

Solution: A can mow 1/4 ̶ 1/12 = 1/6 of the field in 1 day; then he can mow the whole field in 6 days.

I hope you appreciate what elementary school students had to do at that time. Since it was elementary school, they weren’t taught proportions and simple equations but they were “exercised” with fractions in a way that I believe could benefit today’s students understanding of fractions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: