Marveling At The Historical

Math Oldies But Goodies

  • About This Blog

    This blog is mostly about math procedures in textbooks dated from about 1825-1900. I’m writing about them because some of the procedures are exquisite and much more powerful, and simpler, than some of the procedures in current text books. Really!

    I update this blog as frequently as possible ... every 2-3 days. And, if you are a lover of old texts and unique procedures, you might want to talk to me about them, at markdotmath@gmail.com. I’m not an antiquarian; the books I have are dusty, musty, brown-paged scribbled-in texts written by authors with insights into how math works. Unfortunately, most of their procedures have vanished. They’ve been overcome by more traditional perspectives, but you have to realize that at that time, they were teaching the traditional methods.

A 1st Day Handout to Students

Posted by mark schwartz on October 17, 2016

 

Author’s Note: The following is literally a handout given to students the first day of class. I give them time to read it and then we talk about it. The discussion set the tone for their learning and the idea of freedom was a surprising but satisfactory idea, although scary to some who expected this class to be like all previous math classes. What follows is the handout.

In the 1960s, a book titled “Freedom, not License” hit the bookstores. Briefly, it’s a story of the core philosophy of a school named Summerhill in England. The title refers to a subtle distinction between two conditions: freedom – being able to determine your own behaviors, live with the consequences, be self-determining, guided by your own internal discipline and control; and license – interpreting the circumstances in which you are allowed, permitted and “controlled” by an external authority. Actually, it’s misinterpreting the freedom as license, whereby the misinterpretation leads one to rely on external events, rather than understand the freedom to govern one’s own behavior and actions. License also is interfering with other’s freedom.

I give you freedom to succeed but it has to be your success, not driven by external rewards and punishments. I will teach well and you have to learn to learn well. Don’t rely on me to chase you down the hall demanding that you get assignments done on time. That’s your responsibility. Don’t rely on me to threaten you with loss of grade if you don’t attend class. Attendance is your responsibility. Don’t rely on me to control the classroom as is done in elementary school; hushing the noisy, punishing the “unruly”. It’s your responsibility to respect the classroom environment and not disrupt my teaching or the learning of others.

Freedom is a little scary if you’ve never experienced it in a classroom. But consider it a responsibility just like driving. You’re responsible for your car – for its maintenance and performance; for driving responsibly within the wide legal constraints of the speed limit, parking areas, passing, not drinking while driving, etc.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “education” is derived from its Latin root, “educare”.  Educare means “to rear or to bring up”.  Educare itself can be traced to the Latin root words, “e” and “ducere”.  Together, “e-ducere” means to “pull out” or “to lead forth”.  Hence we use the word “educare” to communicate the teaching method through which children and adults are encouraged to “think” and “draw out” information from within.

Notice the last three words: “information from within”. It is within you to learn well and to learn any subject well. I can help you draw it out, but the “you” is the important word in that sentence. You have to attend class, do the assignments, and act respectfully toward yourself and all others in the classroom.

Let me repeat – freedom is scary if you’ve never experienced it in the classroom. I will not check your classwork to see if you’ve done it and it is correct; answers are in the text. I will work with you if your answers are incorrect. You’re responsible for that and it will be hard for you to accept that responsibility because it will be tempting to leave class early and not do it because math makes you uncomfortable and anxious. But I can help you address the lack of math skills that lead you to feel that way.

My teaching doesn’t automatically lead to your learning. But take the freedom offered and use it; don’t let it become license that interferes with your learning.

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